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Why is Changing your Diet SO DIFFICULT?

Why is Changing your Diet SO DIFFICULT?

One of the absolute hardest things as a coach is getting our clients to change their diets. For whatever reason—lack of time time, motivation, willpower, or a massive sugar-addiction—it’s much easier for people to commit to a gym routine than it is for them to stop eating processed foods, or to break their overeating habit.

I’m not suggesting there’s a magic-bullet solution; we believe in different strokes for different folks, but here is some FOOD for thought—and various options and resources—if you’re struggling to change your diet. Hopefully one will resonate with you.

1. Nutrition Coaching with your personal Coach!

If you’re the type who needs one-on-one in-person coaching and someone to hold you accountable, then maybe it’s worth considering working with your coach.

If this is you, reach out to your coach and ask how he or she can help you reach your dietary goals.

2. Develop a healthy relationship with food

One of the best pieces of advice I’ve ever received about nutrition is from a Registered Dietician and professor at the University of Western Ontario Jennifer Broxterman—also the owner of NutritionRx (http://www.nutritionrx.ca).

She reiterated the importance of developing a healthy relationship with food.

What does this mean?

“If you’re questioning whether you have a good relationship with food, think about your relationship with water. You drink water throughout the day, but there’s no pressure about how much to drink or when to drink. You drink when you’re thirsty,” Broxterman said. “Most people have a natural relationship with water.”

She added: “If you’re thinking about food every 5 minutes, if it’s always on your mind, and you’ve lost that natural ability to listen to your body, then you probably don’t have a healthy relationship with food.”

One way to help become healthier is to stop labelling foods as good foods and bad foods, and to stop beating yourself up when you mess up, she explained.

“One of the things I often tell people is it’s a lot like brushing your teeth. Everyone has forgotten to brush their teeth here or there, but you normally don’t beat yourself up about if. Not brushing your teeth once doesn’t lead to a spiral effect of not brushing your teeth for a week. But that often happens with food. Someone ‘cheats,’ and then this spirals into a week of bad eating,” she said.

While Broxterman believes it’s important to eat whole, unprocessed foods most of the time, she believes it’s equally as important to indulge guilt-free here and there. The guilt-free part is the key, she said.

It’s the wanting what you can’t have philosophy, she explained. Preventing yourself from ever having a cheat meal will only lead to obsessing about all the food you can’t eat more than you should.

The point is, if you mess up, forget about it and move on.

~ Emily Beers

Next two points coming next week…

Workout of the Day

Context: Practice

Mobility: Hip

Skill Practice Warm Up: 4 sets of 8 hip extensions or glute ham raises (these can be done on the floor with a partner holding the
feet if needed)

Metabolic Conditioning: “30in to Freedom”

For Time – 4 rounds
6 high box jump
8 supine ring rows
10 hang power clean and jerk
20 wall ball
1 min rest

Rx – 24″/30″, 85/135lbs
Zone 3 – 20″/24″, 55/85lbs
Zone 2 – 3 rounds, 18″/20″, 35/55lbs
Zone 1 – scale as needed

Scaling Guide: 13:00 – 20 min, about 4 min/round including rest

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